History of DU


The Seal

       The Chapter's First Official Seal

In this section are the seminal documents relating to the founding of the chapter in 1869, just four years after the university was founded.  One of the great discoveries in the archives is the minutes of a meeting of a small group of men in May 1869 to discuss founding a new fraternity — a non-secret society that had been first established at Williams College in 1834.

According to the Delta Upsilon International, the name “Delta Upsilon” had been adopted just four years before those Cornellians met in downtown Ithaca to found a new chapter.

On the evening of November 4, 1834, 30 students – ten men from each of the three classes (freshmen, sophomores, and juniors) at Williams College – “all good men and true,” met in the Freshman Recitation Room in West College and formed the Social Fraternity known today as Delta Upsilon International Fraternity. A new era had begun. The first 30 years were trying for the Social Fraternity, which adopted the name “Anti-Secret Confederation” (ASC) once an alliance was formed with other non-secret groups from Union College, Middlebury College, and Amherst College. 

The formation of the ASC led up to the Convention of 1864, which was critical for the young Fraternity. Delegates from three of its seven chapters were in attendance, but a fourth delegate was needed to establish quorum and enact legislation. Just as the group was about to discuss the formal disbanding of the ASC the delegate from the Rutgers Chapter arrived, completing the quorum. The Convention moved forward with its important discussion and legislation and officially adopted the name “Delta Upsilon,” which had already been in use by several of the chapters.

The first 30 years were trying for the Social Fraternity, which adopted the name “Anti-Secret Confederation” (ASC) once an alliance was formed with other non-secret groups from Union College, Middlebury College, and Amherst College. The formation of the ASC led up to the Convention of 1864, which was critical for the young Fraternity.  Delegates from three of its seven chapters were in attendance, but a fourth delegate was needed to establish quorum and enact legislation. Just as the group was about to discuss the formal disbanding of the ASC the delegate from the Rutgers Chapter arrived, completing the quorum. The Convention moved forward with its important discussion and legislation and officially adopted the name “Delta Upsilon,” which had already been in use by several of the chapters.

Go to the next chapter – “The Founding”